Helping to Commercialize
Sustainable Technology and Processes

Duropar Gets SCA support for Production of
Competitive Green Railway Ties

The SCA has committed funding to Brampton, Ontario-based Duropar Technologies Inc. which produces railway ties composed of 100% waste-based composite material. The railway industry in North America alone replaces an estimated 20 million ties annually, typically using a creosote-covered product.

To test its production concepts, Duropar operates in a leased 40,000 sq. ft. former industrial plant in Brampton, Ontario. The plant has been renovated and modified and most of the trial equipment has been delivered and installed. Over the next few months, the company expects to produce 500 railway ties for pre-sales testing and qualification by Canadian Pacific Railway. A successful testing result could lead to a much larger production order from CPR.

Results from customer testing of its prototype have already confirmed that Duropar’s “green” railway ties demonstrate superior performance, while providing environmental benefits with their recyclable and non-toxic materials. The new products are designed to ultimately replace existing concrete, wood and petroleum-based railway products that pose environmental issues. Creosote coated ties contain toxic materials that could leech into the soil and groundwater around train tracks.

jim InglisJim Inglis, President of Duropar

“Our goal is to become the leader in the manufacture of high performance green railway ties that are cost competitive and made from 100% recycled material,” says company president Jim Inglis. There are over 250,000 miles of Class 1 railway track in North America. “As we work through the challenges of the moulding process, our ultimate target would be to produce about 100,000 ties per year.”

Recycled waste material utilized by Duropar includes plastic that is difficult to recycle through municipal programs and old asphalt. The composite ties are durable and weather and insect resistant.

Inglis, a corporate lawyer, says Duropar has created the conditions necessary for rapid growth and initially is focused on its core railway-related business. This will generate revenues, which can be used to grow the core business and fund a licensing effort. In addition to SCA support, the company has received major funding support from Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC).

SCA funding support is designed to help Duropar move forward in its commercialization efforts. In a two-stage program, the company is working towards upgrading its moulding process and achieving a cost-effective production level of one tie per minute.

Inglis says SCA support has been critical to Duropar’s development. “For a new project trying to get off the ground, it’s often essential to have additional funding beyond the private funding from your shareholders. That’s where the SCA stepped in to help us move forward on our environmental project.” ┬áHe adds that SCA expertise will also be supportive in sourcing suitable suppliers of recycled materials.

inspection of processorInspecting the processor Duropar's Brampton, Ontario plant

 

inspection of processorInspecting the processor Duropar's Brampton, Ontario plant

 

Duropar

Duropar Technologies Inc. of Brampton, Ontario, has developed a composite green concrete replacement material that can serve a variety of new product applications based on its performance/cost benefits. Through its involvement with the SDTC, the company partnered with Canadian Pacific Railway on a project that seeks to replace the use of creosote-covered railway ties with ones that are made of 100 per cent waste-based composite material. CPR uses about one million ties annually. Key officers of Duropar are President Jim Inglis and VP Research Brian Ambramson.

Duropar

Duropar Technologies Inc. of Brampton, Ontario, has developed a composite green concrete replacement material that can serve a variety of new product applications based on its performance/cost benefits. Through its involvement with the SDTC, the company partnered with Canadian Pacific Railway on a project that seeks to replace the use of creosote-covered railway ties with ones that are made of 100 per cent waste-based composite material. CPR uses about one million ties annually. Key officers of Duropar are President Jim Inglis and VP Research Brian Ambramson.

Summer 2011 - SusChemAlliance - Page 2
Summer 2011 - SusChemAlliance - Page 2